Posts Tagged

Grammar

How Do You Teach Phrasal Verbs?

LOOK IT UP… As if there wasn’t enough vocabulary for our students to learn, English has certain multi-word expressions that have a different meaning as a whole than the meaning of the separate parts. The most common types of these expressions are idioms and phrasal verbs, and they can be difficult for students to master….

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The Passive Causative

The students had the grammar explained to them by their teacher… Do your students understand the passive voice? Sure. Have they mastered causative verbs? Yep. But do they realize that causative verbs can be passive too? What? Don’t let the passive causative cause your students any angst. Try presenting it using the method below, and wait for that Aha moment!…

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Causative Verbs

I had my students learn these patterns… Causative verbs are just what they sound like: verbs where one person is “causing” another to do something. English has three true causative verbs: have, let, and make. This grammar target has a special pattern that often confuses students because it requires a base verb where an infinitive verb would normally go. Once we present the…

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The Passive Voice

Sentences in English follow the pattern subject – verb – object. The subject does the action (verb) to the object. But what happens when we don’t know who or what did the action? Or what do we do when we want to emphasize the object (recipient of the action) because the subject (doer of the action)…

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Used To, Get Used To, and Be Used To

I USED TO STUDY ENGLISH EVERY DAY, BUT IT STILL TOOK A WHILE TO GET USED TO ALL THE RULES. NOW I’M USED TO ENGLISH GRAMMAR! Last time, I blogged about How to Teach “Used To” in 6 Easy Steps, and I mentioned that the expression used to can sometimes be confusing for students. Once you’ve taught them about used…

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How to Teach “Used To” in 6 Easy Steps

I USED TO UNDERSTAND THIS… Eventually, every English learner needs to master speaking, reading, and writing about the past.  I’ve previously offered advice on  comparing the simple past with the past progressive, But what about the short, common past expression used to? I’ve often found that my students make mistakes with this expression, especially in negative statements…

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Future Perfect Vs. Future Perfect Progressive

HOW LONG CAN ONE VERB BE? When a verb is comprised of four parts, it starts to get complicated—and that’s exactly what happens with the future perfect progressive (will + have + been + -ing verb). The future perfect and the future perfect progressive are rarely used in English, so should we bother teaching these…

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Past Perfect Vs. Past Perfect Progressive

AFTER THEY STUDIED VERB TENSES ALL WEEK, THE STUDENTS HAD HAD ENOUGH GRAMMAR! The past perfect often stumps students since it’s not commonly used. The past perfect progressive, also known as the past perfect continuous, seems even more complicated! But these two verb tenses don’t have to be a mystery to students. With the following helpful diagrams and…

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Present Perfect Vs. Present Perfect Progressive

How long have you been studying English grammar? On our Last post on the blog, we highlighted the two uses of the present perfect tense. This week we’ll continue focusing on this common verb tense by comparing it with the present perfect progressive. It’s important that English language learners realize that there are two distinct uses of the present…

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Present Perfect: Two Uses

Have you ever tried to explain the present perfect tense? The present perfect is a common tense in English, but it is one of the tougher ones to learn. First of all, there are two distinct uses. Second of all, one use is similar to the simple past, and the other is very similar to the…

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